With the first quarter of the hockey season in the books, it’s as good a time as ever to review where things stand for the Class of 2019. This draft is obviously headlined by American standout Jack Hughes, but there’s a few trends that I feel differentiate the 2019 Draft from the 2018 Draft. For one, if 2018 was the Defenseman draft, 2019 is the Center draft, with 9 centers currently sitting in my Top 15. Furthermore, this looks to be a strong draft for the US Development Program, as they not only boast the #1 pick in Jack Hughes, but also 7 of the top 31 and 10 of the top 50.

 

Before we begin, here’s a quick overview of the grading system for each individual attribute I’ve assigned to each player. Keep in mind, these values are not permanent and may change based on what I see between now and my final ranking in June. The grades are laid out as a scale between 20 and 80, with 50 being average.

20-25 = Very Poor
30 = Poor
35 = Bad
40 = Well-Below Average
45 = Below Average
50 = Average
55 = Above Average
60 = Very Good
65 = Elite
70 = World Class
75-80 = Generational

1. Jack Hughes, C, USA U-18 (USDP)
5’10” | 179 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 65
Hands: 70
Physicality: 40
Hockey Sense: 70
Shot Grade: 55

Dynamic, intelligent, and skilled center that should be mentioned in the same breath as American standouts Jack Eichel and Auston Matthews. Hughes is a wonderful skater who’s quick on his edges with world class skill, vision, and offensive instincts. A truly gifted puck handler that can flat out embarrass opposing defenders when he gets going and is truly feeling it with the puck on his stick. Only real criticism is his lack of size, but his elite skating ability and world class skill more than make up for it. Clear cut, consensus #1 selection for 2019.

2. Kaapo Kakko, RW, TPS (LIIGA)
6’1″ | 181 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 55
Hands: 65
Physicality: 55
Hockey Sense: 65
Shot Grade: 55

Finnish winger with high-end intelligence and a well-rounded offensive toolbox, Kakko is able to dictate the pace of play with the puck on his stick with remarkable poise and vision. His brain gets elite marks, as do his slick puck handling abilities that he can use to evade defenders and find teammates in the offensive zone. Not afraid to slow the pace of play down in order to pick apart defenses with his elite smarts and has shown stretches of dominate play in the Finnish Elite League as a 17 year old. High-end, 1st line upside.

3. Vasily Podkolzin, RW, SKA-1946 St. Petersburg (MHL)
6’0″ | 190 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 65
Hands: 65
Physicality: 45
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 60

Every time I’ve watched Podkolzin play, he’s blown me away. There’s so much to like about his game, starting with his electrifying offensive skill set that can change a game on any given shift. Podkolzin possesses elite level hands that he couples with a high motor and great speed to put defenders on their heels. Has a good shot and can beat goaltenders from the outside, however I think he’s at his best when driving to the net and putting defenders on their heels in their own zone. In my view, Kakko’s biggest opponent for top winger in the 2019 class at this time.

4. Kirby Dach, C, Saskatoon (WHL)
6’4″ | 198 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 55
Hockey Sense: 65
Shot Grade: 50

Big center with plus attributes in skill, skating, and a brain to match. It’s rare to find big-men with the playmaking ability Dach has, as he possesses excellent vision with crafty hands to open up plays for his teammates. The more I’ve watched Dach, the more impressed I’ve been with his smarts on the offensive side of the puck, while also being no slouch on the defensive side of the puck. An admittedly average shooter, but he’s able to find scoring opportunities with a willingness to play below the dots and skating ability to put pressure on opposing defenses.

5. Bowen Byram, D, Vancouver (WHL)
6’1″ | 192 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 50
Hockey Sense: 65
Shot Grade: 50

Byram possesses all the tools that you look for in a high-end defensive prospect, as he’s a complete package of mobility, intelligence, and two-way acumen. A strong defender with good defensive zone awareness and gap control with the ability to transition the puck quickly with smooth, fluid skating ability. Very rarely do you see Byram make a mistake with the puck on his stick, and he possesses great poise and isn’t afraid to make the smart, safe play when under pressure. I wonder about Byram’s offensive ceiling at the NHL level, but he has all the tools to play 23+ minutes a night and play 15 years in the league.

6. Matthew Boldy, RW/LW, USA U-18 (USDP)
6’2″ | 187 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 50
Hockey Sense: 65
Shot Grade: 55

Well-rounded American winger with an elite-level brain, Boldy has become one of the biggest risers in this class and has elevated himself into the conversation as an elite prospect due to his growth as an offensive player. Equally skilled as both a playmaker and goal-scorer due to his excellent hockey sense and elusiveness; not quite as dynamic as some of the other top prospects in this draft, but his brain and IQ are in the top echelon among his peers. Excellent versatility and can play both wings as well.

7. Dylan Cozens, C, Lethbridge (WHL)
6’3″ | 185 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 60
Hockey Sense: 60
Shot Grade: 55

It’s hard not to be tantalized by the all-around package Cozens possesses, starting with an NHL-ready frame at 6’3″ coupled with excellent skating ability for a player his size. I’ve flipped between calling Cozens’ hockey sense elite or just high-end, and I lean towards the latter as he’s consistently able to make players around him better and drive his line despite not having elite vision or playmaking ability. Excellent strength and play below the dots as well.

8. Trevor Zegras, C, USA U-18 (USDP)
6’0″ | 168 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 45
Hockey Sense: 65
Shot Grade: 50

Zegras is likely the player I’ve had the hardest time pin pointing through the first quarter of the season, and a large part of that is my concerns over his offensive ceiling. Zegras has skill and very good skating ability, but I don’t find either quality dynamic in comparison to some of his contemporaries, and in spite of this he continues to produce at a near two point per game pace. Part of this may be the Jack Hughes factor of having softer match-ups as USA’s #2 center, but I believe it’s his brain that makes Zegras stand out as a top prospect. Zegras has elite level hockey sense and awareness which makes him an excellent playmaker as he consistently makes his linemates better, and the reason he’s a top 10 pick is he has enough skill to finish the plays his brain creates. Again, not overly dynamic, but it’s Zegras’ brain that makes him a real player.

9. Peyton Krebs, C/LW, Kootenay (WHL)
5’11” | 181 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 65
Hands: 60
Physicality: 45
Hockey Sense: 60
Shot Grade: 50

Krebs is a highly skilled forward whose calling card is his speed and skating ability. I wouldn’t quite call his hands elite, but they are very good as he can beat goaltenders with slick stick handling ability, while he finds most of his escapability on defenders in his excellent agility and quickness on his edges. I would call his shot just average at the moment, though he can score the odd goal from the outside and I debated giving him an above average rating on his shot. In addition, I’d like to see Krebs light the WHL on fire more than he has to this point in the season with the dynamic skill set he has, though I would attribute that more to the weak Kootenay team he finds himself on.

10. Alex Newhook, C, Victoria (WHL)
5’11” | 183 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 45
Hockey Sense: 65
Shot Grade: 55

I grapple with having Newhook just inside my Top 10, because when I watch him and review his skill set, he seems like a Top 5 prospect. Newhook has high-end skating ability and speed, great hands, and an elite level brain on his shoulders that allows him to dominate the Junior A level. However, I believe it’s there that lies the problem – I’ve only ever seen Newhook dominate at the Junior A level, and when he’s played amongst his peers at the International level, I’ve only found him to be good, not great. It’s easy to fall in love with a player who dominates Canadian Junior A like Newhook does, and I’ve been fooled in the past rating these kinds of players as elite level when they might just be very good playing in an inferior league. With Newhook, I simply need more viewing time to decide if he’s truly an elite level prospect, or just very good.

11. Ryan Suzuki, C, Barrie (OHL)
6’0″ | 172 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 55
Hands: 60
Physicality: 45
Hockey Sense: 65
Shot Grade: 50

Pure playmaking center with excellent intelligence and offensive instincts. Suzuki admittedly has some flaws to his game, notably size, shot, and the lack of a high-end gear in terms of speed, however he’s smart enough to mitigate these flaws in order to allow his strengths to shine. Suzuki is among the smartest players in this draft and possesses elite level vision in the offensive zone, and while I’m not blown away by his skating, I’ve considered bumping his grade up due to his excellent agility and a low center of a gravity that allows him to stay strong on the puck.

12. Philip Broberg, D, AIK (SWE-2)
6’3″ | 198 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 60
Hands: 55
Physicality: 60
Hockey Sense: 60
Shot Grade: 55

Broberg was one of the most seductive players at the 2018 Hlinka-Gretzky Cup, where he was among the best defensemen in the tournament while playing for Sweden. Broberg possesses the tools that many NHL teams covet – a smooth and at times explosive skater, strength on the puck and a willingness to play physical, and a blossoming offensive skill set to accompany his NHL ready 6’3” frame. The thing I wonder the most about with Broberg is how good his smarts actually are. There’s times when he makes excellent reads on both sides of the puck and is masterful at breaking the puck up the ice with his team, however there’s times when he’s also very prone to turnovers due to trying to do too much. He’s a confident player that believes he can make plays, however he needs to be more consistent in his decision making to truly solidify himself as a Top 10 pick in this draft for me.

13. Arthur Kaliyev, LW, Hamilton (OHL)
6’2″ | 190 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 50
Hands: 60
Physicality: 55
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 65

Every draft has its elite pure goal scorer, and I’d be hard pressed to find a better one in the 2019 Class than Kaliyev. I, like many others, have some reservations regarding his ability to drive a line and his ability as a playmaker seems limited, but when put with a good set-up man, Kaliyev can work some magic. He possesses high-end hands and arguably the best shot in the class, coupled with a stocky frame which can make him a handful on opposing defenders. Probably not a line driver at the NHL level, but if you put the right personnel around him, I have no qualms with selecting a player like Kaliyev in the Top 15 due to the goal-scoring potential he possesses.

14. Alex Turcotte, C, USA U-18 (USDP)
5’11” | 194 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 65
Hands: 60
Physicality: 50
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 55

Competitive American center that plays with tenacity, tempo, and considerable skill. The former attributes are truly what define Turcotte as a player, as he possesses arguably the highest motor in this draft in addition to excellent skating ability which allows him to put pressure and stress on opposing defenses. Owns good skill and can make the odd flashy play, though I find he’s at his best when he’s playing to his strengths as a blue collar, workman-like player. Not as dynamic as his USNDP contemporaries which gives me some concerns regarding his offensive ceiling, although his work ethic makes him a darling among coaches and he owns enough skill to hang in a top 6 role. Draws a lot of comparisons to Zach Parise as he plays with reckless abandon both below the dots and in front of the net.

15. Raphaël Lavoie, C/RW, Halifax (QMJHL)
6’4″ | 198 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 50
Hands: 65
Physicality: 55
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 55

Big man with some of the best hands in the Draft, Lavoie’s calling card is his elite level hands that he can use to beat defenders one-on-one on a regular basis to create scoring opportunities. It’s hard to find big men with the level of skill Lavoie has, and that’s what makes him so tantalizing as a prospect. I find too much of his game to be just average or above it to be considered an elite prospect in the 2019 Draft however, which gives me some reservation when I see some scouts place him firmly in their Top 10’s. For one, his skating is just about average and he lacks a gear when it comes to speed, and I don’t find his physicality as dominating as it should be for a player his size in Major Junior, though his size can be a problem for both netminders and defenders. Certainly thinks the game more as a goal scorer and his vision with the puck makes me question his playmaking ability, however I think he could become an effective playmaker with the range and puck skills he has if he truly worked at it.

16. Cam York, D, USA U-18 (USDP)
5’11” | 172 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 60
Hands: 55
Physicality: 40
Hockey Sense: 65
Shot Grade: 40

I’d be hard pressed to find a smarter blue liner in the 2019 Class than Cam York, and it’s his elite level brain that allows him to cover for some of his shortcomings in other aspects of his game. Although York is a very good skater, I don’t find he has a dynamic gear in terms of speed and I don’t find the same quality in his hands either, though they are good. York also has a noticeably well-below average shot, which in conjunction with his lack of dynamic hands or skating could limit his offensive potential, if not for his high-end brain. I find York to have remarkable offensive instincts and he has the poise to quarterback a powerplay with ease; a smooth passer that makes it easier for his more skilled teammates to shine as I rarely find York to make a poor decision or read with the puck on his stick.

17. Valentin Nussbaumer, C, Shawinigan (QMJHL)
6’0″ | 168 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 50
Hands: 60
Physicality: 45
Hockey Sense: 60
Shot Grade: 50

Swiss import playing his first year in North America, Nussbaumer has taken some time to acclimate himself while playing for a noticeably weak Shawinigan team. Nussbaumer has been on the international scene for quite some time, making his first appearance at the U20 tournament with Switzerland as just a 17 year old and making his first NLA appearance at the same time, and there’s certainly things to like in his offensive game that’s had him on the prospect radar for some time. Nussbaumer is a very good playmaker, as he combines a high-end brain and vision with hands and skill that allow him to make the odd dynamic play. My only real complaints with Nussbaumer is he’s noticeably light and can find himself getting out-muscled by larger opponents, and although he’s very agile, I find him to be just an average skater teetering on above average.

18. Mikko Kokkonen, D, Jukurit (LIIGA)
5’11” | 190 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 60
Hands: 55
Physicality: 50
Hockey Sense: 60
Shot Grade: 50

The more I’ve watched Kokkonen, the more he’s grown on me, and that’s because I can’t really pick out anything he does particularly poorly and rarely seems out place playing against men in Finland. For one, I find Kokkonen to be a very smart and intelligent player on both sides of the puck, as he routinely makes good reads and rarely makes an ill-advised play. Furthermore, he’s a very smooth skater which allows him to both stay with attackers, but also transition the puck quickly up the ice. Despite finding his shot just average, Kokkonen is a big time volume shooter and is very good at getting his shots through, which can set up offensive opportunities for his team off of rebounds and create havoc in front. I have some concerns about his offensive ceiling, but I find so little to pick on when I watch Kokkonen play.

19. Maxim Cajkovic, RW/LW, Saint John (QMJHL)
5’11” | 187 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 55
Hands: 60
Physicality: 45
Hockey Sense: 60
Shot Grade: 60

Cajkovic is likely the player I’ve soured on the most since the start of the season, however that’s likely because of the high expectations I had for Cajkovic entering his first season of Major Junior as an import. Last Spring, Cajkovic dominated the U18’s like few other players have, as he finished the tournament with 11 points (4G, 7A) in just 5 games played, second only to Jack Hughes who needed 7 games to put up 12 points. In that tournament, Cajkovic showed me excellent hands, offensive awareness, and a great shot on top of it all, however he hasn’t nearly grasped Major Junior like I thought he would. I’ve soured on certain aspects of his game as he’s struggled on an admittedly weak Saint John team, such as his hockey sense and skating ability, both of which received high marks from me following his U18 performance. Being an international star for so long leaves me believing he can find his rhythm in North America, however he’ll need to show me more the rest of the way if he’s to stay firmly in my 1st Round.

20. Daniil Gutik, LW, Loko Yaroslavl (MHL)
6’3″ | 179 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 45
Hands: 65
Physicality: 55
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 50

Gutik is one of those players that when I watch him play, I believe there’s a lot more there than what the score sheet says. Gutik has had a notably soft start to his 2018-19 campaign playing in Russia’s junior circuit, however Gutik possesses a remarkable amount of skill for a player his size. Gutik owns some of the best hands in this draft class as he can dangle like a smaller skill forward despite his 6’3” frame, he’s remarkably creative with the puck on his stick and he does own some good vision as well, which makes me optimistic on his future as a playmaker. The biggest criticism I can make of Gutik is he’s a very notably weak skater, as he lacks both a step in speed and isn’t particularly quick or agile to compensate. Some work with a skating coach would go a long, long way in Gutik turning the corner as a top prospect.

21. Jakob Pelletier, LW, Moncton (QMJHL)
5’9″ | 161 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 45
Hockey Sense: 60
Shot Grade: 50

A small forward with enough skill to compensate, Pelletier is just one of those players that continues to produce despite all that’s stacked against him. Pelletier obviously lacks the size to compete with other players physically as he stands at just 5’9”, but that doesn’t seem to matter, as he’s fabulously creative with the puck on his stick and has enough skill to work around bigger players in the offensive zone. Owns good vision and has the puck skills to dish to his linemates, which allows him to be a dual threat as both a playmaker and a goal scorer, though I find his skill set favors the former more prominently. Doesn’t have as high of a gear in terms of speed that I would like to see from a player his size, though his speed and agility are both very good.

22. Cole Caufield, RW, USA U-18 (USDP)
5’7″ | 157 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 25
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 65

Another forward that has great offensive ability to spite his noticeably slight frame, Caufield is among the most dangerous goal scorers to come through the US Development Program in recent years. Caufield’s shot and release is arguably second to none in this class, as he can not only get the puck off his stick in a hurry, but can also do so with both velocity and accuracy. A good amount of skill and can stick handle in tight, and also owns enough speed and agility to be effective at his size. Though he and Pelletier are so similar in their pluses and minuses, I favor Pelletier only slightly due to Pelletier’s advantage in both hockey sense and physical ability.

23. Moritz Seider, D, Mannheim (DEL)
6’4″ | 183 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 60
Hands: 50
Physicality: 55
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 55

German defender who has been playing professionally against men in Germany since he was 16, Seider has few holes in his game to combine with great skating ability and poise, which as a right-shot defenseman standing at 6’4”, makes him an incredibly attractive prospect. Seider is truly an excellent skater for a player his size, he’s remarkably fluid on his skates which in conjunction with his size and reach can make him a bastion on the defensive side of the puck. Doesn’t own great skill, although I wouldn’t classify his hands as poor, and to compensate for his lack of skill he keeps plays simple and smart, which as a young defenseman makes him very reliable in any situation.

24. Victor Söderström, D, Brynäs (SHL)
5’11” | 176 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 60
Hands: 55
Physicality: 45
Hockey Sense: 60
Shot Grade: 50

Söderström is a two-way defender that makes it so hard to nit-pick his game due to his great hockey smarts and decision making. Söderström won’t blow you away when it comes to skill or offensive ability, but what he does so well is his fluidity as a skater and his instincts with the puck on his stick. He’s very agile which allows him to control his gaps on attackers very well and jump into the rush when appropriate. I don’t find him to have the highest offensive ceiling which is a moderate concern when considering his size at just 5’11”, but I think there’s enough smarts there to constitute Top 4 NHL upside.

25. Albin Grewe, C/RW, Djurgårdens J20 (SWE-JR)
6’0″ | 176 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 65
Hands: 55
Physicality: 55
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 50

Grewe is a workmanlike player who loves to be a pest on opposing defenses, as he’s an excellent skater with explosive speed that allows him to put tons of pressure on defensemen as they attempt to breakout the puck. Willing to play a blue collar game and work for loose pucks and is at his best when doing so, though he does have enough skill to make plays in the offensive zone. Some have described Grewe’s hands as high-end, and though I’m not quite there, they are good and worth noting. He can be prone to at times losing his head and taking reckless penalties or making ill-advised plays, but there’s enough there in his work ethic and skill to warrant a 1st round selection at this time.

26. Nolan Foote, LW, Kelowna (WHL)
6’3″ | 187 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 50
Hands: 60
Physicality: 60
Hockey Sense: 50
Shot Grade: 60

NHL bloodlines with his father Adam and older brother Cal, Nolan is a big power winger that combines enough skill with heaviness that it should be noted. Though his hockey sense and skating aren’t at the level that I would consider him a line driver at the NHL level, Foote does own surprisingly good hands for a player his size as he can make the occasional skill play. Excels best in the offensive zone as a goal scorer as he has a heavy shot when given the opportunity to let it loose, and shows good size and strength below the dots to play off the cycle with his linemates.

27. Nils Höglander, LW, Rögle (SHL)
5’9″ | 185 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 40
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 50

Slight but skilled Swedish forward who has played with enough work ethic and smarts to gain trust at the SHL level, Höglander excels best as a playmaker in the offensive zone as he possesses slick hands that allow him to make the occasional flashy play and has enough vision with the puck on his stick to find teammates for offensive opportunities. Though I’d just classify his shot as average, he has enough skill and awareness to get himself into areas to score goals which can make him a dual threat on the offensive side of the puck. Stronger on his skates than his size would suggest, but not enough so that his size shouldn’t be noted as a weakness.

28. Anttoni Honka, D, JYP (LIIGA)
5’10” | 170 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 60
Hands: 60
Physicality: 35
Hockey Sense: 55
Shot Grade: 50

Honka has likely been one of the most frustrating players for me to watch in this class so far, because there are attributes there for me to like. Anttoni is a strong, fluid skater, a gifted puck handler, and has some obvious offensive instincts which he’s demonstrated in the Finnish Elite League since his -1 Draft year. My frustration with Honka is the perceived lack of consistency I have with him, as there’s times when his skating ability and skill come together in a way that makes him look like a Top 15 pick, and then other times when I watch him play where he looks out of place when it comes to his smarts and decision making. I want to believe Anttoni is closer to when I see him at his best, but I’m getting less patient as his 18 year old season for JYP seems to be a step back from where he was as a 17 year old.

29. Spencer Knight, G, USA U-18 (USDP)
6’3″ | 198 | Catches: Left

Athleticism: 55
Hands: 50
Size: 60
Hockey Sense: 55
Positioning: 60

Consensus top goaltender at this time for the 2019 Draft, Knight has many of the attributes you look for in a goaltender by today’s standards. Standing at 6’3”, Knight has an NHL ready frame and allows himself to use his size to his advantage with excellent positioning. Tracks the puck well and reads the play with relative ease, while also having enough athleticism as a big man to move across the crease or post to post when the time calls for it. Only real complaint is he’s just average up high and could better utilize his hands to cut down on rebounds.

30. Pavel Dorofeyev, LW/RW, Metallurg Magnitogorsk (KHL)
6’0″ | 163 | Shoots: Left

Skating: 55
Hands: 65
Physicality: 40
Hockey Sense: 50
Shot Grade: 60

Exciting offensive player with a lot of room to grow, Dorofeyev is a high skill player who loves to create with the puck on his stick. Can dangle with the best of them and can at times create something out of nothing with just his hands when he gets going, although he is still very raw. I question his hockey sense and ability as a playmaker as I don’t find he’s often able to find teammates with his vision or passing ability, and he does need to bulk up a considerable amount as he only stands at a shade over 160 lbs. With that in mind though, he’s a true boom or bust player as he has the raw skill and a very good shot to be dangerous as a goal scorer.

31. Bobby Brink, C, Sioux City (USHL)
5’10” | 165 | Shoots: Right

Skating: 60
Hands: 55
Physicality: 40
Hockey Sense: 60
Shot Grade: 50

Playmaking center who has the ability to play quick, Brink has had a great start to his USHL campaign as he’s been able to catapult himself into the 1st Round discussion. A good skater that plays to his strengths by thinking the game at a high pace, owns just above average skill but is often able to out-think opponents in the offensive zone to create opportunities. Committed to a strong program at the University of Denver as well, where he’ll likely have room to grow into a Top 6 center. Needs a few years in college, but there’s enough smarts and skill there to make it worth the wait.

Honorable Mentions (sorted by league):

Matvei Guskov, C, London (OHL)
Mikhail Abramov, RW, Victoriaville (QMJHL)
Artemi Knyazev, D, Chicoutimi (QMJHL)
Yaroslav Likhachyov, RW, Gatineau (QMJHL)
Samuel Poulin, LW, Sherbrooke (QMJHL)
Sasha Mutala, RW, Tri-City (WHL)
Matthew Robertson, D, Edmonton (WHL)
Ben Brinkman, D, University of Minnesota (NCAA)
John Beecher, C, USA U-18 (USDP)
Alex Vlasic, D, USA U-18 (USDP)
Marshall Warren, D, USA U-18 (USDP)
Robert Mastrosimone, LW, Chicago (USHL)
Brady Meyer, C, Des Moines (USHL)
Ryder Donovan, C, Duluth East (USHS)
Ilya Mironov, D, Loko Yaroslavl (MHL)
Dmitri Sheshin, LW, Stalnye Magnitogorsk (MHL)
Tobias Björnfot, D, Djurgårdens J20 (SWE-JR)
Simon Holmström, RW, HV-71 J20 (SWE-JR)
Henri Nikkanen, C, Jukurit (LIIGA)
Patrik Puistola, LW, LeKi (FIN-2)